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Earlier this year our hermanas at the Black Women’s Health Imperative (the Imperative) – the only organization devoted solely to advancing the health and wellness of America’s 20 million Black women and girls through advocacy and public policy, health education, research, and leadership development – welcomed Linda Goler Blount, MPH as the organization’s new President & CEO. We’re excited that Blount has joined the Imperative, and bid farewell to the organization’s longtime president, Eleanor Hinton Hoytt, who will be sincerely missed.

Blount is a seasoned professional, bringing with her over two decades of experience in strategy, policy, and health. She has worked at both non-profit and for-profit organizations, helping them build their brands and boost results. Prior to joining the Imperative, she held positions at United Way of Greater Atlanta, WFG Equity, American Cancer Society, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

With her leadership skills and passion for health equity, Blount hopes to make a difference the lives of the many people the Imperative serves.  She said that she hopes that her work with the Imperative will “empower women, change behavior and conversations, and influence policy makers.” While speaking to leaders from intersecting social justice movements, she extended an invitation for cross-movement building, saying “we have to do this together…the issues are too big. We can’t do it all alone. We have strengths and resources to share.”

The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health familia is thrilled to welcome Blount as the BWHI’s new fierce and fearless leader. We look forward to collaborating on the many important issues that impact women of color in the fight for health equity and reproductive justice.

nwghaad-webbadge-125xEach year on March 10th people across the country come together to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS and its impact on women and girls on National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD). For too long, HIV/AIDS was classified as a disease that only affected gay men – a dangerous and inaccurate myth that left many women out of the conversation. However, in the 33 years since the epidemic started we have seen that  HIV can affect anyone, regardless of race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, or gender. NWGHAAD was established to bring awareness to a specific population – women and girls – that is affected by HIV/AIDS, but is too often forgotten.

HIV/AIDS is a serious public health issue for women and girls. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1.1 million people in the United States are living with HIV. Of those people, one in four (25%) is a woman 13 or older. Furthermore, an estimated 27,000 women have HIV but don’t know their status. Because of the misinformation surrounding the disease, many heterosexual women may not be aware of their own risk factors.

While HIV/AIDS has a serious impact on all mujeres y niñas, Latin@s are disproportionately impacted by the disease. In 2010 Latin@s represented eight percent of new HIV infections, which was more than four times the rate of new HIV infections for non-Hispanic white women. Additionally, the areas of the U.S. where HIV/AIDS is most prevalent – including California, Florida, Texas, and New York – are also the areas with the highest Latino populations and fastest growing Latino populations.

Why are our herman@s at such high risk for contracting HIV? According to the CDC, there are several complex factors that increase Latin@s’ risk of catching the virus, including:

  • Socioeconomic factors: Factors such as poverty, discrimination, and lack of access to affordable and quality healthcare are major contributors.
  • Stigma: The stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, including how it was contracted, may prevent Latin@s from seeking prevention services, testing, and treatment.
  • Cultural factors: Latinos in the U.S. are diverse and trace their roots to many countries. Studies show that country-specific cultural factors may impact behavioral risk factors, including how HIV is contracted. Additionally, traditional gender roles and cultural norms, which perpetuate harmful mandates about Latinas’ sexuality, may increase prevention challenges.
  • High rates of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs): Latin@s have higher rates of STIs than non-Hispanic white women. Pre-existing STIs can increase an individual’s risk for HIV infection once exposed to the virus.
  • Immigration status: Immigrant women and families may be hesitant to seek preventive, testing, and treatment services due to fear of having to disclose their status and being deported.

Although the statistics paint a somber picture, NWGHAAD provides an ideal opportunity start changing them for the better. The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health encourages everyone to use NWGHAAD to take action and take control by getting the facts, getting tested, and starting a conversation about HIV/AIDS and Latin@s.

Being a woman in Texas, and across the country, is a battle. We are getting attacked on all sides. Everyone seems to know what is best for us to do with our bodies. Our decisions and our health isn’t respected, valued or supported. Enough is enough. Women are fighting back. Latinas are fighting back, especially in Texas.

The Rio-Grande Valley is one of the poorest areas of our country. Prior to 2011, the women of this region depended on state-funded clinics for healthcare and family planning services. This isn’t just contraceptives, but cancer screenings, pap smears, and more. And then everything changed. 2011 was also the year that the state legislature passed one of the most destructive budgets in state history. [x]

This budget punished Texas clinics by defunding all who were affiliated with abortion providers, even if they didn’t provide abortions. Many other states are also doing the same. The number of women receiving services in the Rio-Grande Valley was reduced by 75% after the cuts. [x]

What ACTUALLY happens when states cut back and defund public clinics simply for being associated with abortion providers? What are the real consequences of these actions? Who is actually affected? Does defunding clinics eliminate abortions? No. Instead of moving forward and bettering the lives of others, we are stepping back in time. Where there is a demand, someone will supply it, even if that means lives are at risk. What these cuts did was hand women hangers, the same hangers that took so many lives in the past. What these cuts do is separate families, create fear, and increase health issues especially because the incidence of cervical cancer in Texas is 19% higher than the national average [x]. Families in Texas, and across the United States, are already dealing with immigration issues, poverty wages, exploitation, food desserts, and these cuts aren’t making lives any easier. Take a moment to remember that not everyone has access to health services during the same time many are rejoicing over the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Do something about it!

Workers lose their jobs due to cuts.
After the cuts, Paula Saldaña lost her job as a community educator for a Planned Parenthood clinic in Brownsville, Texas. She continues to give workshops on reproductive health as a volunteer. In the video below, Paula shares her experiences out in Texas and the frustration she feels about the cuts.

Families are torn apart
Adriana found herself crossing the border back and forth to receive health services in Mexico, until the violence at the border increased. Her family has been split up due to deportations. She suffers with health issues, and the uncertainty of not being able to take proper care of herself as she raises her two grand-kids. Not being able to take proper care of herself leaves her family in a very vulnerable place; especially because Adriana is the sole provider for her family in the United States. Adriana shares her experiences below.

In late 2012 and early 2013, the Center for Reproductive Rights and the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health documented the impact of state funding cuts to family planning services on women in Texas and created a human rights report. The report and information about this partnership can be found at Nuestro Texas. The report draws from the stories of women in Texas to show how funding cuts to women’s preventive services are more than failed policies—they are violations of their human rights.

Read the Nuestro Texas report here
Like Nuestro Texas on Facebook
Follow Nuestro Texas on Twitter

A few days ago my sister told me she didn’t really like her curly hair. I stared at this little replica of me. It felt like I was looking into a mirror. Little me also didn’t like her curly hair. All the pretty girls have straight hair. I saw all the wrong things staring back at me in the mirror.

For days, I thought about the conversation her and I had. How can I create a space in which my sister and I feel happy and empowered with who we are? What things can I do, say and have that will make her feel secure in herself, both on the outside and inside? Where beauty isn’t the only focus? What do little ones need to feel at peace and in control of their future and their bodies when everything around them tells them they’re worthless?

I thought about the ways in which we sometimes don’t support the decisions those around us make. How inferior we make each other feel. How we judge one on another for the things we do or don’t do. As if there was a “normal” or “correct” way to be. As if there was a specific way to live our lives.

Here in New York I can’t walk down the street without seeing ads that say young mothers, and their families, will grow up and amount to nothing. Messages that tell us, “You’re worthless and deserve what is happening to you because you did things the “wrong way””. Messages that tell the little ones what horrible lives they will live and what horrible parents they have.

Pointless messages because no matter what decision we make, we seem to always lose and are belittled because of them. Sex is bad. Abortion is bad. Parenting at your age is bad. Using contraceptives is bad. Everything is bad. Our existence is bad. All decisions we make will be judged.

But, guess what, we’re not going anywhere.

On the other hand, I hope to work with warriors that will take matters into their own hands. Warriors that will be happy with who they are. Warriors that will be at peace with the decisions they make for themselves and their families. Warriors that will look into the mirror and not let these messages affect what they believe to be true about themselves. At least, that’s where I hope to be alongside my family and people in my community. I hope to live and create spaces in which decisions, including abortion and parenting, are respected and supported. Spaces in which my sister can feel confident in herself and understand that there’s more to life and herself than just beauty.



Spaces like that are being built. We are hosting a webinar training with 3 sessions aimed to serve young mothers. This training is open to all young mothers and are completely free. Session 1 already took place. Session 2 is happening on Nov 15 6pm EST which will talk about why it is important to organize young mothers and why young motherhood happens. Session 3 is happening on Dec 13 also at 6pm EST and it takes a closer look on what advocacy means and how you can use your experiences to push others into action. If you’re a young mother, register and let others know: http://tinyurl.com/MomELola

By Jessica Karina Guerra-Ugalde

I was thrilled and honored to stand behind the President last week as he talked about how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) benefits all of our communities.  Because of the immense pride I have in the ACA, I wanted to share my enrollment story and what it means to me.  I graduated college in 2008, and did what college kids throughout the country do after graduation – I moved home and began looking for work. I worked as an intern and later as a temp- both positions did not offer any benefits. At that point, I was 22 years old, and I really did not think that anything could affect me.  I was healthy and rarely got sick. Immediately after the ACA became law and was implemented, my mom went to her job to ensure that I was covered under her health insurance plan. A week after I received my health insurance card, I became very sick. I had to see a number of different specialists, had lab work done, and ultimately, the doctors were able to diagnose and treat me for pneumonia. If I didn’t have health insurance, if it wasn’t for ObamaCare, I wouldn’t be here today in good health.

The ACA is good for Latinas and our community because it has given young people like me, access to health insurance in a time when it’s hard to find work. It’s even more difficult to find a job that offers benefits. Because of ACA, I can go to sleep at night knowing that I can see the doctor whenever I want, without worrying about not having money to pay for a provider out of pocket or for medication. For young people graduating college, it adds stress to your job hunt to find a job that would offer you health care benefits. A few weeks after I got better, I was able to access all the care that I needed to make sure I was 100%.  That included an appointment with the dentist, ophthalmologist, and my annual physical. When you have health insurance, you take even the smallest things for granted like seeing the eye doctor for contacts.

I believe that my experience, my story, is the story of many young people across the country. My mom says that the ACA, all the policy makers who worked to pass this law, and the people who have fought for the ACA have all saved my life and I agree. Thanks to this law, I was able to get the care I needed when I needed it.

On the 35th anniversary of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), we are reminded that women of color experience multiple forms of discrimination because of their race, gender, immigration status, sexual orientation, and yes even when they become pregnant.  In fact, this discrimination often translates into poor health outcomes for these women and their children.  Last year, researchers found that discrimination against young, pregnant, urban women of color contributed to symptoms of depression and consequently, lower birth weight, an indicator of poor future health for their children.  In that study, 62% of its participants were Latina.

Although we know women of color experience discrimination, we often don’t talk about how they suffer from workplace discrimination if they become pregnant.  Many women of color and immigrant women, particularly Latinas, are disproportionately represented in low-earning, physically demanding jobs.  For instance, more than 750,000 Latinas work in the production, transportation, and material moving occupations and another nearly 2.7 million Latinas are employed in the service industry.  There have been a disproportionate number of pregnancy discrimination claims from these employment sectors.  If a Latina becomes pregnant and her employer refuses to make slight accommodations that would allow her to stay healthy and keep her job, then she is forced to choose between her health and her paycheck.  For example, an accommodation for a cashier could be as simple as allowing her to sit on a stool rather than standing on her feet or allowing her to have additional break time.  To make matters worse, many women of color are the sole breadwinners for their household.  An employer who refuses to make these accommodations jeopardizes the economic security of a Latina and her family, and possibly, her ability to have access to health care.

One way to mark the anniversary of the PDA is to pass the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act.  Although  PDA outlaws discrimination based on pregnancy, employers are still getting away with pushing pregnant, women of color out of the workplace.  The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act would build on existing law by requiring employers to give reasonable accommodations when workers need them due to pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, just like they do for workers who face similar limitations.  As a result, it will ensure that women of color, including Latinas, can continue working while staying healthy.  If you think pregnant, women of color workers deserve fair treatment and should be able to keep their jobs, take action here.

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